By Michele Linn published January 10, 2013

4 Expert Opinions: Does More Content Marketing Mean Better Content Marketing?

One of the things we discovered from the 2013 B2B Content Marketing Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends research is that usage of almost every content marketing tactic has increased over the last year. It may seem like great news that marketing teams are understanding and embracing content marketing.

But what does this upward trend really mean?

During Content Marketing World, several of our CMI consultants gathered to talk about the implications of the latest B2B content marketing research. In this first video of our roundtable discussion, Carla Johnson, Michael Weiss, Ardath Albee, and Jay Baer discuss whether more content marketing necessarily means better content marketing. Thanks to Steve Rotter, VP of Digital Marketing at Brightcove, for moderating the conversation.

Are you experiencing the same content marketing concerns that our consultants bring up? Do you feel like we have gone from not enough content to too much? As Ardath says:

“It’s all about planning… everybody is going to have to start backing up to ‘Ok, what makes our content really work for us, what makes it unique, interesting and sticky for our audience?’ “

If you are struggling with creating “sticky” content and better content engagement, here are some additional ideas you might find helpful:

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Author: Michele Linn

Michele is the Content Development Director of the Content Marketing Institute and a B2B content marketing consultant who has a passion for helping companies use content to connect with their ideal buyers. You can follow her on Twitter at @michelelinn or read more of her posts on Savvy B2B Marketing.

Other posts by Michele Linn

  • dougrek

    Ardath is right-on. There is so much schlock out there, much of it reconstituted from other posts and publications with little thought to originality or value to the end-user. If you’ve ever coached youth sports where every child is handed a basketball, or been in a classroom where every child is given a noisemaker, they immediately begin bouncing the balls and making noise. All of these adults have been given an interconnected digital toy box and they’re all feeling compelled to make noise. Not surprisingly, more and more of it is falling on deaf ears.

  • Doug Kessler

    Great conversation. Ardath nailed it — the risk is that we may be producing lots of (dare I say it) Crap.