By Joe Pulizzi published October 24, 2015

This Week in Content Marketing: Can Content Save Advertising?

content-save-advertising-podcast-coverPNR: This Old Marketing with Joe Pulizzi and Robert Rose can be found on both iTunes and Stitcher.

In this week’s episode of #ThisOldMarketing, Robert and I discuss whether content marketing can really save advertising – and whether it actually needs to be saved. Next, we admire Mitch Joel’s take on the state of blogging, but consider the forces affecting it to be evolutionary, rather than the end of blogging as we know it. Finally, we discuss what’s happening in the world of mega-agencies – a senior Pepsi executive contends they are threatened by clients reducing the number of agencies they work with and by the rise of content marketing. Rants and raves include some questionable content marketing stats and a brilliant native advertisement from LexCorp. We wrap up the show with a #ThisOldMarketing example from Westinghouse.

This week’s show

(Recorded live October 19, 2015; Length: 1:01:09)

Download this week’s PNR This Old Marketing podcast.

If you enjoy our PNR podcasts, we would love if you would rate it, or post a review, on iTunes.

1. Content marketing in the news

  • Can content save advertising? (8:11) What used to be regarded as one of the most skippable forms of advertising — custom content — is now being held up by many in the industry as the thing that just might save advertising from all manner of ad-avoidance behavior, including ad skipping and ad blocking, says Ad Age. This is another article that incorrectly lumps content marketing together with advertorials, native advertising, and branded content. It also treats web page traffic and social sharing as if they are the only important measures of engagement. Robert believes advertising doesn’t need to be “saved.” It’s evolving into something new.
  • Is this the end of blogging? (17:37) In a thought-provoking blog post, Mitch Joel points out that it’s getting harder to lure readers from social channels and content aggregation sites to his excellent blog. As a result, he is starting to experiment with Facebook Notes and other channels to publish his content. Robert believes Joel’s thought-provoking argument may be the best answer for bloggers, but not for brands. I believe even well-known bloggers need to build a subscribed audience in order to survive.
  • PepsiCo executive says agency model is going to break (30:34): The advertising agency model is under threat as big marketers make serious cuts in the number of agencies they work with, fight for better prices, and invest in video outside of the traditional confines of television. So says Bradley Jakeman, president of PepsiCo’s global beverage group. He is also “absolutely baffled” that large advertising holding companies seem to be ignoring opportunities to purchase talented content producers. Robert and I agree that such acquisitions are starting to happen, but they don’t seem to be on the radar of big media covering advertising and large ad agencies.

2. Sponsor (36:29)

  • 10 questions to ask before you commit to a content marketing platform: When you’re selecting a content marketing platform for your company or agency, asking the right questions up front can increase your odds of success. Consider these 10 questions from BrandpointHUB: http://bit.ly/brandpointhub2

brandpoint_hub

3. Rants and raves (39:19)

  • Joe’s rant and rave: I love Upvoted, a new publication launched by Reddit, which contains a diverse collection of original content created by the social channel’s staff. I think it’s an excellent move to further engage its already passionate community. There’s just one downside, which I outline in the podcast.

    upvoted
    I also want to call attention to new research from Forrester, which says 47% of companies have raised their content marketing budgets by 20% or more. That data doesn’t align with CMI’s latest benchmark survey. When I dug deeper, I discovered that the Forrester study was based on only 86 survey respondents – not very statistically accurate.
  • Robert’s rave and rant: Robert is a huge fan of Superman. He is thrilled with a new native ad on Fortune that profiles the Man of Steel’s arch enemy, Lex Luthor, Jr. It describes LexCorp’s pivot into technology and Lex Jr.’s role in its transformation. A banner ad on the page takes you to a slick website for the faux company. It’s a great experience, but Robert identified several ways it could have been made even better.

    Robert’s rant: A new report from Aberdeen Group that says marketers who utilize data and analytics in their content marketing are seeing five times as much revenue as those who don’t. It’s a decent report, but it could have been so much better, he laments.

4. This Old Marketing example of the week (54:10)

  • Westinghouse: Radio broadcasting in the United States started with the Westinghouse Company. The company asked Frank Conrad, one of its engineers, to start broadcasting music while they would sell radios to pay for the new service. Westinghouse applied for a commercial radio license and started KDKA, the first government-licensed radio station, in 1920. In 1921, there were six licensed radio stations; by the following year, that number had quintupled to 30. In 1923, there were 556 radio stations. What’s remarkable is that Westinghouse realized that it needed to increase adoption of radio receivers for this new industry to be a success. That’s why early advertising focused on helping the company sell more radios, not to promote advertisers’ products (today’s predominant business model). Likewise, radio shows (content) were created to provide an engaging experience, which also helped drive the growth of this new form of media. This approach to evangelizing a new type of communication medium makes Westinghouse an excellent example of #ThisOldMarketing.

westinghouse-tom-example Image source

For a full list of PNR archives, go to the main This Old Marketing page.

How do I subscribe?

itunes logo

stitcher logo

Author: Joe Pulizzi

Joe Pulizzi considers himself the poster boy for content marketing. Founder of the Content Marketing Institute , Joe evangelizes content marketing around the world through keynotes, articles, tweets and his books, including best-selling Epic Content Marketing (McGraw-Hill) and the new book, Content Inc. Check out Joe's two podcasts. If you want to get on his good side, send him something orange. For more on Joe, check out his personal site or follow him on Twitter @JoePulizzi.

Other posts by Joe Pulizzi

Join Over 150,000 of your Peers!

Get daily articles and news delivered to your email inbox and get CMI’s exclusive e-book Launch Your Own Content Marketing Program FREE!

  • TGG

    Hi Joe, first time on the site and based on this post, I’m sure I’ll be back.

    Of course, the problem with ranting is you tend to get the same back in response… If all you want is a response, then that’s OK, I suppose. Anyway, I’ve got to take exception to the accuracy of your statement about statistical accuracy… The sample size of 86 respondents could yield an accurate result. It might be bang on, in fact. The problem with a small sample size is you’re likely to have a low precision; a low reproducibility of the result and therefore a low confidence that the result is accurate, even if it is…

    One way your article could have been better…

    • http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/ Joe Pulizzi

      Correct…as we discussed on the podcast, it “could” be statistically significant (but we don’t have access to the report itself…it’s gated). But with the enterprise companies we meet with on a regular basis, we don’t see their findings as a statement about what is really happening.

      Appreciate the feedback. Keep it coming!

  • http://bonehook.com/ David Burn

    “This is another article that incorrectly lumps content marketing together with advertorials, native advertising, and branded content.”
    I’d love to hear your argument as to why they ought not to be lumped together.

    • http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/ Joe Pulizzi

      Sure David

      An advertorial, also called native advertising, is where a brand pays to place content on someone else’s site (usually a media company). The content is usually helpful or educational. These programs are generally short-term campaigns.

      Branded content is typically a compelling story that weaves in the brand story in some way. The hero of the story is generally the brand, not the audience.

      Content marketing is an ongoing approach to build an audience over time, through the creation of consistent content-based experiences. Content marketing usually has a destination where readers will access the information.

      Helpful?

      • http://bonehook.com/ David Burn

        The pieces are interwoven, which perpetuates a flimsy understanding of the field. For instance, I can place an advertorial of old (never touching on its new name) as part of my content marketing program.

        Branded content, according to the above, could result in almost any piece of advertising imaginable. I don’t think of branded content through the hero lens. Is product placement branded content? Is Red Bull’s newsstand magazine an example of branded content, or has it risen above that status to something yet unnamed?

        You mention that content marketing often has a destination for readers. Red Bull has lots of such destinations, but content marketing is the Big Tent, not the video channel on YouTube or the MLS Soccer team in New Jersey.

        We can find a way to cut through these circular discussions. Thanks Joe.

        • http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/ Joe Pulizzi

          Thanks David.. I totally agree with you that they are interwoven, but the approaches and goals are certainly different. Red Bull Media House has an overall strategy to build an audience around their content…that’s a content marketing approach. If they took a piece of their content and paid for placement, on say, New York Times, that would be a native advertising play. If Red Bull does a series of stories about the history of the shape of their can, that’s branded content. But in doing that, they aren’t trying to build an audience, they have a different goal. Red Bulletin, their magazine, very rarely talks about their product. They’ve created a content brand targeting a very specific audience (now over 2 million strong).

          Nothing is wrong with any of these approaches, but in my mind they are different and marketers need to understand when to employ one over the other. If we don’t, everything is content and everything is advertising and when people are in a meeting there is no understanding.

          Thanks for keeping the conversation going.

  • http://ReportMom.com Anne Pittman

    Do you want to know something really interesting that is worth paying your attention right now,a fabulous online opportunity to work for those people who want to use their free time so that they can make some extra money using their computers… I have been working on this for last two and half years and I am making 60-90 dollar/ hour … In the past week I have earned 13,70 dollars for almost 20 hours sitting ….

    Any skills, Degree ,Specific qualification is not necessary for this, just keyboard typing and a good working and reliable internet connection ….

    Any time limitations to start work is not required … You may do this work at any time when you willing to do it ….

    Do you want to know how I have been doing this?…..….see this {Iink} on my !|profile|!` to know how I am working` on this`

    gtesv

  • http://ReportMom.com ashley mayfield

    Do you want to know something really interesting that is worth paying your attention right now,a fabulous online opportunity to work for those people who want to use their free time so that they can make some extra money using their computers… I have been working on this for last two and half years and I am making 60-90 dollar/ hour … In the past week I have earned 13,70 dollars for almost 20 hours sitting ….

    Any skills, Degree ,Specific qualification is not necessary for this, just keyboard typing and a good working and reliable internet connection ….

    Any time limitations to start work is not required … You may do this work at any time when you willing to do it ….

    Do you want to know how I have been doing this?…..….see this {Iink} on my !|profile|!` to know how I am working` on this`

    ^we

  • http://ReportMom.com Lisa Beatty

    In today’s life everyone knows that money is very important, so I want to make everyone’s life easier and provide you financial freedom by telling you about a project that is paying me $10 k or more every month by doing simple tasks that anyone with basic computer skills can do and you need only good internet connection

    ~~check`my` ~~http website~~~listed~~~on~~~my~~~~{PrIvate}`~~~~~`page` ~~~~~~~!~

    ,jhvfgku

  • http://careerstoday50.com/Umar/Awesome2/Index.html Hilda Emrich

    Finally i earn 93$ in an hour…You also can join it It is amazing I sure you also have a great Benifit with this offer….Some limited seats are left..You must join FREE and make cash at home

    ================>>> Link my account