By Pamela Muldoon published February 5, 2015

Rebecca Lieb Shares Her Path to the Digital Era

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The content marketing industry is made up of professionals from all walks of life and varied backgrounds. It’s an element of our industry that keeps it fresh and exciting. In this episode of The Pivot, Todd Wheatland sits down with the fascinating and multi-talented Rebecca Lieb, Industry Analyst, Altimeter Group. Her journey into content marketing may surprise you. Yet again, with the breakdown of traditional media in embracing the potential of the digital age, perhaps her journey makes perfect sense.

What may surprise you

  • Rebecca has a master’s degree in film history and theory.
  • She has worked as a film journalist for Variety, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal.
  • Her grandfather and father were filmmakers.
  • Rebecca also has a degree in art history.
  • She has lived in Paris twice and was living in Germany when the Berlin Wall came down.
  • Rebecca handled global marketing for RTL Television, one of the biggest broadcasting brands in Europe, and then was recruited by USA Networks, which was an independent network at the time.
  • She was the Editor-in-Chief for ClickZ in the early 2000s.
  • She opened up the U.S. office of Econsultancy.

Rebecca’s pivot

While Rebecca was with USA Networks it launched the Sci-Fi Channel. In the early days of the commercial internet, it was her first opportunity to help advertisers create interactive marketing campaigns. She loved it. Shortly after this, USA Networks was bought and sold a few times, eventually landing with Universal. She chose to walk away and hasn’t worked in traditional media since. She hasn’t owned a television for over 10 years. After working with a few start-ups, she landed the position of Editor-in-Chief at ClickZ, where she learned all she could about digital advertising marketing and media.

A book provides credibility

She isn’t the first to say this and she will not be the last. As a published author, Rebecca has reaped the benefits on many professional levels. Authoring a book provides a higher level of credibility, which brings about more speaking opportunities and consultant projects. As the industry of content marketing has grown, so has the number of people calling themselves experts. As a published author, you have the capability to stand out from the competition.

A book really represents you as a thought leader. I do a great deal of public speaking, it doesn’t hurt to have a book to show off your credentials because as we know in this industry, we’re up to here with gurus and experts. There have to be certain benchmarks to distinguish people who perhaps have a little more substance than the people who are running around saying that they have substance. There are a lot of wannabe hangers-on in this industry. I’m not saying everybody has to write a book, but there is a demand to create content to add value to conversations and to further discussions as things develop in this industry.

Listen to Todd’s full interview with Rebecca Lieb here:

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Cover image by Joseph Kalinowski/Content Marketing Institute

Author: Pamela Muldoon

Pamela Muldoon is the Podcast Network Director for the CMI Podcast Network. In her role with CMI, she assists the podcast hosts with the development, production, distribution and promotion of their shows. Pamela is a veteran podcaster who can be heard on the CMI Podcast Network with her latest show "Content Marketing NEXT". To date, she has interviewed over 200 business and marketing professionals as part of her podcast formats. She is also a professional VoiceOver talent specializing in commercial, narration, eLearning, and promo projects. Learn more at www.pamelamuldoon.com or www.muldoonautovo.com. Follow her on Twitter @pamelamuldoon.

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  • rogercparker

    I found this interview fascinating from several perspectives…

    Until this interview, I hadn’t made the connection between Rebecca Lieb and the ClicckZ network. My basement contains several 3-ring binders of printouts of ClickZ articles. I should have recognized the preciseness of her words.

    Second, it’s always fascinating to associate written words–articles and blog posts–with not only the writer’s voice, but also the story of their background, including their various career zigs and zags. These interviews humanize their words.

    Finally, I appreciate Rebecca’s use of the term “substance” in her discussion of the benefits of writing a book, as well as her other other comments about thought leadership that Pam has included in her last paragraph, above.
    Fascinating from several perspectives…

    Until this interview, I hadn’t made the connection between Rebecca Lieb and the ClicckZ network. My basement contains several 3-ring binders of printouts of ClickZ articles.

    Second, it’s always fascinating to associate written words–articles and blog posts–with not only a voice, but also the story of the writer’s background, and their various career zigs and zags. These interviews humanize their words.

    Finally, I really appreciate Rebecca’s use of the term “substance” in her discussion of the benefits of writing a book, as well as her other other comments about thought leadership that Pam has included in her the last paragraph of her summary, above.
    All in all, an excellent time investment for all.
    Roger

    • http://twitter.com/toddwheatland Todd Wheatland

      Many thanks for the detailed comments Roger. Although – I’m a little bit scared to ask what else you have in your basement if you’re storing old ClickZ articles!

    • RebeccaLieb

      Roger, what a kind, thoughtful response. And how great to hear there are still die-hard fans of “ClickZ Classic” out there. I had a meeting just yesterday with someone who had worked there under the current regime and had never heard my name, or Danny Sullivan’s, or any of the many, many other people who fostered that important network of content back in the good old days. All that said, I can’t believe you printed it out! Good on ya!