By Joe Pulizzi published April 6, 2013

How Brand Content Helped Transform a Bank into a Media Master

brand-media-company-jyskebankHow many banks can you think of that put so much faith in the power of brand content that they began producing award-winning television and video shows on a daily basis? No matter how hard you try, it’s likely you’ll only come up with one: Jyske (pronounced You-ska) Bank.

Jyske Bank has created one of the most high-tech, in-house television production studios in Denmark. In fact, the company refers to itself as both a bank and a media company. Jyskebank.tv produces amazing financial programming, as well as compelling stories that the bank believes are relevant to its core audience of younger consumers and small enterprises.

Jyske’s brand content program is made up of two key values:

  1. Remaining true to the organization’s guiding vision, which it calls “Our Foundations
  2. Telling good stories

In addition, every piece of content the company shares is embeddable or sharable on other sites. Because of this “sharing” philosophy, 80 percent of Jyske’s content is viewed, not on its website or owned channels, but rather on outside sources, according to the company.

Historically, this level of open content sharing has opened up some revolutionary opportunities for businesses. But it’s a risky move for any large corporation, let alone a bank.

Instead of paying for multiple, traditional sponsorships like most banks and corporate brands do, Jyske works with businesses that are interested in leveraging its media expertise. This means that instead of outlaying cash, organizations propose media partnership opportunities to Jyske — an attractive option due to the credibility and reach the bank’s content program has helped it to build.

Both the World Mobile Congress and the Cannes Lions Festival has approached Jyske to take part in this unique relationship, offering Jyske access to logo placements and exclusive interviews that they had previously reserved for media companies — strong evidence that with reach and a loyal audience comes great opportunity.

And this type of sharing doesn’t stop with the bank’s external customers. Every Friday morning, Jyske holds a live, full-access television program available to every employee. This type of internal training shepherds its core vision of being open and honest with all people.

Jyske doesn’t have to buy media attention — it owns its media, and spreads it in innovative ways that its competitors should be aspiring to compete with.

(Hat tip to Michael Buckley from King Content for the example.)

Looking for more inspiration from businesses that are approaching content marketing in unique ways? Read CMI’s Ultimate eBook: 100 Content Marketing Examples

Author: Joe Pulizzi

Joe Pulizzi considers himself the poster boy for content marketing. Founder of the Content Marketing Institute, Joe evangelizes content marketing around the world through keynotes, articles, tweets and his books, Managing Content Marketing and Get Content Get Customers. Joe's latest book is Epic Content Marketing (McGraw-Hill). If you want to get on his good side, send him something orange. For more on Joe, check out his personal site or follow him on Twitter @JoePulizzi.

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  • Yeye Yates

    terms of advertising medium, the concept has been there as early as huge companies realized that they can use radio to promote their products. New marketers and SEO people should strongly consider utilizing brand content and use ColibriTool (http://colibritool.com) to measure if it is producing significant or meager results.

  • Andre

    I liked the idea of “key values”. I think that companies already realized that “every company is a media company”, however, most of them still struggling to take an advantage out of it. In my point of view a good content strategy aligned to the company’s key values is essential for a successful campaign!

  • http://twitter.com/CaraPosey Cara Posey

    Joe, this ties into our long overdue discussion about thought leadership and content marketing. What Jyske has been able to do so deftly is build brand awareness while they have built their authority within their industry. They are building content that is centered in expertise and becoming sought after for their perspectives. To me, this will be a central shift for content marketers and inbound marketers…creating content that not only drives conversions, but actually raises the profile of the company due to thought leadership in the space. Thanks for sharing this interesting case study. Not every company has to become a “media company” in order to accomplish the same results, but I do think the strategy is key.

    • http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/ Joe Pulizzi

      Thanks Cara…I like your take. Although, I believe literally all companies are media companies already in the sense that they are working to produce content for profit (attract and retain customers), but I see your point. I know, great case study here.

      • http://twitter.com/CaraPosey Cara Posey

        I definitely agree with you that most companies are media companies in one sense or another. Jyske takes the idea to more of an extreme than many are able to do. My hope is that other companies will realize they can take the general ideas of how to engage and relate with customers and do it in different ways…that’s part of the fun, right? Thanks for your reply.

  • Nenad

    There are two more or less similar examples. One is Toni&Guy TV (which is not their only media channel), Toni&Guy is a hairdressing company, and the other is M&S Bank TV. Good to check them out. N.

    • http://contentmarketinginstitute.com/ Joe Pulizzi

      Thanks Nenad…if you have any results on those, send them on…and thanks again.

  • Latosha Mills

    Thanks for this post.

    http://www.getcliqup.com