By Clare McDermott published March 16, 2012

CM 2015: An Interview With David Meerman Scott, Marketing Strategist and Best-Selling Author

In the February issue of Chief Content Officer magazine, we asked the top experts in content marketing:

Content 2015: Where are we headed in the next three years?
Tech 2015: What technologies will change the field?
Company 2015: Which companies ‘get it’?
Personal 2015: How will each of us change as marketers?

We were surprised by how many marketers mentioned the need for more and better tools that help companies build scale across their content marketing programs.

You can find the CCO magazine article here , but we wanted to share our full-length interview with David Meerman Scott. Enjoy!

Content 2015

It’s what I’ve been talking about for the last year: Real time. It’s about instant. I see so few content marketers who truly understand the power of an instant blog post, an out-of-the-gate video, a fast update to a website. In my experience, most content marketers still have a campaign approach to content marketing. There’s nothing wrong with that. It’s not either or. But there’s a big opportunity to take advantage of what’s going on right now, this instant.

I recently launched a new book called Newsjacking. It’s about creating a piece of content quickly, as a result of something going on in the news. ‘News’ may be in the wider scope of worldwide news or, if you’re a B2B organization, what’s going on in your industry. Being able to create a piece of content (a blog post, for example) that drafts off the news that’s breaking at that moment—it’s a tremendous opportunity and few companies do it.

Tech 2015

I don’t really think that the technologies are really changing all that much. The biggest tech change we’ve had in content marketing in the last decade is the idea that Google indexes in real time. That change happened a year ago. Now when somebody publishes a blog post or a YouTube video, the content of that blog post or the title/metadata of the YouTube video is instantly indexed by Google. It’s a huge change as it relates to content marketing. When you put something out there, it’s instantly indexed. When you create something, the speed at which it can be found is really exciting.

Company 2015

IBM. Eloqua. Hubspot. Boeing. National Resources Defense Council. The Red Cross. I find it fascinating when companies hire journalists to create content for them—and most of the companies I just mentioned do that. It’s hard for marketers and copywriters to create compelling content. They tend to create stuff that’s product centric and too hype-filled. Journalists tell a story.

Self 2015

The biggest hurdle marketers face is this: You need to recognize no one cares about you, your company or your product. We marketers tend to come at things from an egotistical perspective, but customers don’t really care. They care about themselves and solving their own problems.

Another is achieving the real-time mindset. That’s a tough hurdle to overcome. Marketing and content marketing has traditionally been a long-term, campaign-planning process. Companies thought, “Next month we’ll do a series of three to four pieces on this particular topic.” They plan ahead and put the content out when they are ready. A real-time mindset means you are putting content out when the market is ready. 

Author: Clare McDermott

Clare McDermott is the editor of Chief Content Officer magazine and owner of SoloPortfolio, a Boston-based content marketing provider for professional service firms.You can follow her @soloportfolio.

Other posts by Clare McDermott

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  • David Meerman Scott

    Thanks for the great questions, Clare! 

  • Julie Squires

    David, buyer personas could solve a lot of the content orientation you mention that is a problem for marketers. Do you still like the buyer persona approach?  Thanks!

  • Gregg Freishtat

    David, great post.  Could not agree more on the need for “real time” content marketing and the comparison to “campaign marketing” is spot on.  Its not that there is a lack of quality on point content that could easily be used in a content marketing campaign, its that its illegal to copy and use and impracticable to get permission to use each piece of content as it is found to be relevant.  This dove tails nicely into you observation that new or other “real time” content can be an catalyst to a quick new post or blog.  I think the combination of external professional content and internal commentary on that content for a business purpose is a trend we will see emerging far before 2015.  New technologies and business models will be required but their are plenty of folks (like us and other) that are working on that.

    Gregg Freishtat
    CEO, Scribit & Vertical Acuity